Are We Cultivating A Gangland Culture?

I wonder what the intent was for the people who thought about making…

I wonder what the intent was for the people who thought about making the Gangland series.  This is actually more just a question than anything.

I have to admit, when Gangland comes on I’m glued to the tube.  It’s entertaining, informative, and seemingly a very strong part of the culture that we are all living in today.  I watched what has become to be the “cliche” episode today about “Lords of Dopetown” Frank Lucas and Nicky Barnes and listened as the narrator said that these where the “heroes of Harlem” during that time.  I couldn’t help but acknowledge that in so many ways, they still are.  We live in, breed, and nourish this in the Hip Hop culture so if this seems like an issue to you then YOU have to change it.  If not… keep doing “you”.

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So to my original thought.  It seems that as we continue to watch this we stay in the “American Gangster” mindset.  While this maybe beneficial to a VERY few, it has a definite end to the rest of everyone else.  Prison and/or death.

Not to take away from what was done or to be labeled as a “hater”, BUT…  what happened to glorifying our positive leaders also?  Why not talk about the doctors and lawyers; the teachers and politicians; the fathers and the mothers?   Why not show peoples great accomplishments and overcome hurdles as well?  Is it a must that every image we see be “baller”, “gangster”, “hustler”, or athlete?  I know people are going to jump up and scream, “What about Obama?”, but it seems that since Obama there has been more American Gangster-ish images being propagated to the masses.   In a lot of cases the Obama Effect has worn off.

So, what now? How do we find a healthy and beneficial balance?  Did people stop dreaming when they started hustling?  Was “by any means necessary” applied beyond intention or is this all acceptable?  I’m old enough to go out and find what I want to know and know that one way is not the only way but what about our kids?  What about the Hip Hop culture that we live in, bread, and continue to perpetuate?  What happens now?

Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

Blast It Or Trash It: Circly City Art – Adrian Bless [Video]

Adrian Bless (Indiana) drops the 4 minute freestyle to exercise his…

Adrian Bless (Indiana) drops the 4 minute freestyle to exercise his skills and show his talent.  What WE want to know is… Blast It… Or Trash It?

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Blast It Or Trash It?  Leave a comment and let us know.

 

Hot Off The Press: Ba Ba Ba Ballin – Mouse Ft. Ant Hustle

Check out the video for the new single from Naptown’s own…

Check out the promo video for the  new single from Naptown’s own Mouse Ft. Ant Hustle – Ba Ba Ba Ballin

Be on the lookout for Mouse to be dropping a LexZyne Productions single soon.  “When Ya Droppin Kid!!!”

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New Music: Rebel Come Down – Silence DemAll Ft. Young Nations & Lasro

The BlacWater project is unique in that it has the ability to cover & contrasts the…

“Rebel Come Down” was shot mainly in the northern township of Alexandria located in Johannesburg, South Africa. A densely populated area, it remains one of the poorest townships in the country. The backdrop of this video captures everyday people getting through economic struggles as a result of effects of South African post-era apartheid.

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“BlacWater” is the first ever collaborative album between an African producer, Draztik of Johannesburg South Africa, and an US artist, Silence Demall hailing from the Oakland/San Jose, California. The two met over the internet and soon began to share music back and forth; gaining a mutual respect & admiration for each other’s work in the process. In 2008, during a trip to Johannesburg, South Africa that Silence made to work with disadvantage youth, the pair met in person. It was during this trip that the two began formulating an idea to work on a collaborative album, comprising mainly of Silence’s lyrics over Draztik beats, but also bridging the two continents with artists from their respective regions. The song “Rebel Come Down” epitomizes this idea, matching Silence with South African hip hop heavyweight, Young Nations and Bay Area based (Guyana born) singer/ragga artist, Lasro. The result is a blend of hip hop with a flare of roots reggae; reminiscent of a period in which music was used as a vehicle to get a message to the masses. The BlacWater project is unique in that it has the ability to cover & contrasts the struggles that take place in the urban communities of America and South Africa’s inner city/township.

The duo just completed a promo tour in Johannesburg and Durban; performances, radio and tv spots. Currently BlacWater is working on their full length album and planning out more visuals for the project.

Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

Blast It Or Trash It: Say It To My Face – Abe Linx & Tully Cicero

Blast It Or Trash It: Say It To My Face – Abe Linx &…

“The Law” is a compilation of records, in which features GFE’s own: Trajik, Justus, Profane S. Flames, Abe Linx, Boy Boy, Robb Skee, Tully Cicero, and IMG.

Would you Blast It Or Trash It?  Play the video then let us know what you think.

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Download The Law Compilation for FREE.

Blast It Or Trash It?  Leave a comment below to let us know what you would do.

Turn Your Speakers WAY Up: Classic Hip Hop Can’t Weight

The Fat Boys is a successful American hip-hop music trio from…

The Fat Boys (Mark Morales a.k.a. “Prince Markie Dee”, Damon Wimbley a.k.a. “Kool Rock-Ski”, Darren Robinson a.k.a. “Buff Love” a.k.a. “The Human Beat Box”) is a successful American hip-hop music trio from Brooklyn, New York City, that emerged in the early 1980s. Briefly, the group was known originally as the Disco 3.
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The reason we at LexZyne News & Info post these videos and songs is that there is a new generation of fans and artists that may have never heard these before.  We feel that it’s important for you to know where and how this culture started and grew to what it is today.  Also, we want the older generation to remember and enjoy what we grew up on.  That’s why these videos make it into the Turn Your Speakers Up segment of our site.  So TURN YOUR DAMN SPEAKERS UP and let’s enjoy this musical part of our culture!

Big Buff Love, the Human Beatbox, was a pioneer in beatboxing (using his mouth to create hip hop percussion sounds). He and another contemporary, Doug E. Fresh, popularized beatboxing, inspiring other artists to innovate, including Biz Markie and, later, others such as Rahzel.
The group’s 1984 self-titled debut, The Fat Boys, is considered by many to be an early hip hop classic, with artists like Boogie Down Productions and Redman, among others, making references to the album.
The group’s popularity ballooned by the 1990s. For example, Jay-Z laments the breakup of the Fat Boys in his song the “Heart of the City.” Prince Markie Dee left the group to pursue solo interests, which included producing many early tracks for Mariah Carey and Mary J Blige which included her debut single, “Real Love.” In 1991, the remaining two members, Kool Rock Ski and Buff Love, carried on as a duo and released Mack Daddy (1991), but shortly thereafter, the group disbanded (until 2008).
On December 10, 1995, Buff Love died of a heart attack in Rosedale, Queens, New York. He was 28 years old and reportedly weighed 450 lbs. Prince Markie Dee is currently a radio host for WMIB 103.5 FM the Beat in Miami, Florida on its afternoon drive-time show. Kool Rock-ski resides in New York.

“The Most Dangerous Place For An African American Is In The Womb.” – Really?

A three-story high billboard in New York City’s SoHo section reads…

anti-abortion billboard

A three-story high billboard in New York City’s SoHo section reads “The Most Dangerous Place For An African American Is In The Womb.” What the heck are they trying to say?

UPDATE:  You can go to Change.org and sign a digital petition to help force the removal of these offensive billboards by clicking here!

Controversial billboards from anti-abortion groups are nothing new. But the one that is plastered on a building in SoHo takes a daily SMH and turns it into a WTF.

“The Most Dangerous Place For An African American Is In The Womb,” is the statement that a three-story high billboard from anti-abortion group “Life Always” has plastered on Sixth Ave. and Watts St.

But what exactly does that statement mean?

“Life Always” claims that Planned Parenthood targets minority neighborhoods and that African-American women have abortions at nearly three times the rate of other women.

Oh, so now we get it. Because abortions are allegedly higher for African American women, that means that the most dangerous place for a child is in the womb.


*This image above is of a similar race-baiting billboard that appeared in Atlanta last year.

Now that is offensive. Not only is Life Always using a scare tactic that downright divisive, it’s message is right smack in a neighborhood that people of all colors have to stare at on daily basis. No matter how you feel about abortion, you have to admit that the message is totally inappropriate and downright offensive. Children of all colors die of many things, to call the womb of an African American woman the most dangerous place for a child is tasteless and that billboard should be torn down immediately.

Source: TheBVX

If you’re on Twitter and you want to express your thoughts DIRECTLY to the via Twitter contact @ThatsAbortion.   Stephen Broden is one of the board members along with others found here.

UPDATE:  You can go to Change.org and sign a digital petition to help force the removal of these offensive billboards by clicking here!

Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

Turn You Speakers WAY Up: D&D All Stars [Video]

Volume 2 of the D&D project surpassed everyone’s expectations by…

Volume 2 of the D&D project surpassed everyone’s expectations by far.  Everyone from Krumbsnatcha, to QNC, to Afu Ra is on here representing the studio where many Dj Premier classics have been conceived over the years.

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Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.